While performing extensive research on the Paleozoic shark genus Petalodus, I uncovered many holotype specimens. Yet, in searching, there are still a couple that I have not been able to locate. Not finding some is not surprising, all the missing holotypes were described during the 19th century and the 1800s.Read More →

This 15th specimen of Petalodus ohioensis was lying right out in the open today. The odd part was its placement. Last Fall I had pulled a piece of limestone to shore and was attempting to split it. I cleaved off a few small pieces. However, it was getting late andRead More →

The shark tooth, Petalodus ohioensis, is the most common vertebrate fossil found locally. I have collected twelve specimens from the Brush Creek Limestone and one from the Pine Creek Limestone. I have a comprehensive live research article in general on the entire genus, Petalodus, available on this website. Click toRead More →

Petalodus ohioensis from the Pine Creek Limestone

This is the first specimen of Petalodus ohioensis I have recovered from Pine Creek Limestone. Specimens of Petalodus can be found in marine zones throughout the Glenshaw Formation, so finding one here is no surprise. However through several trips to the locality, which is around 10 miles North East fromRead More →

Petalodus ohioensis

This specimen is lower crowned than recent ones collected. It is also heavily covered in a white substance that may be mineral aragonite or something else. This being my 11th tooth specimen, I may start reporting on these in groups. The bottom right of the below photo has a pieceRead More →

Petalodus ohioensis

Petalodus ohioensis tooth number 10 is a beautiful specimen. It’s well-shaped, well colored, and has a solid root. I worked the specimen with an air scribe for some time, removing the matrix from a perimeter slowly, before uncovering the tooth itself. Air scribes are useful but troublesome to work with.Read More →

Petalodus tooth cutting edge

A quick accidental find tonight. I stack fossil pieces all over the place. This particular piece has been out in the weather all Winter. The tip of a Petalodus Tooth blade attached to the rock. Upon examining the specimen under the microscope, it found it to be removable. With aRead More →