Euphemites, maybe

Update: This may be Euphemites. Examples from the Pennsylvanian Atlas of Life. Euphemites is a genus of the Bellerophontidae family. It is firmly within the Mollusca Phylum, but exact taxonomy is not universally agreed upon. I will likely have a lot of unidentified pieces. This includes many brachiopods, as theyRead More →

Macroneuropteris

Macroneuropteris is a seed plant that has a temporal range only in the Carboniferous. I found this specimen in the talus near the lab. Most specimens I find are of small leaves, or large pieces of bark. This was more certainly a large leaf. I wanted to show the leafRead More →

Wilkingia

This specimen is probably Wilkingia. But it could also be Phestia. I compared photos from a quick web search of each and I found examples of Wilkingia to be far more comparable. Wilkingia lived from the Carboniferous until the Permian periods of time. This particular specimen is from eroded matrix,Read More →

Punctospirifer was first described by North in 1920. In existed from 376 until 252.3 million years ago. It went extinct during the Permian Extinction. I believe my identification of this species is likely correct, but I’m not good with this type of Brachiopod. Upon seeing the large double grove andRead More →

Maybe Pseudorthoceras, but I’m going to give more weight to Mooreoceras because of the large size of this specimen. The shell is a longicone. Also, the position of the Septal neck is off center, as shown on the following plate. I found the impression of the larger piece still inRead More →

Pecopteris

2019-04-LS-000 Identification as Pecopteris is very likely. This comes from a newly found shale landslide. The piece had fell out of the hill and was lying on the ground. The rock is very fragile. The colors shown are more rare in this area, more commonly being a grey shale withRead More →

A solitary type of coral found commonly in the local limestone/marine layer. I have been told the two examples below are perhaps of two different species. The first piece is assumed to be Stereostylus. The second piece that is split down the middle was thought to perhaps be Lophophyllidium. ThatRead More →

A few layers of rock contain several concretions. We called these dinosaur eggs when we were younger, not knowing exactly what they were. We have come to find that these are simply hard, compact masses of matter. These settle within the muds and sands that make the local rocks. SomeRead More →

This specimen started out showing about 40-50% of itself within the Limestone matrix is was embedded in. I spent a good deal of time with the air scribe to free it. I am confident that it is Metacoceras, but I welcome other opinions. The raised spines along the top sideRead More →