Gastropods from Pine Creek Limestone

The Pine Creek Limestone is supposed to be somewhere around here, but perhaps it was not laid down as strata in this area. It’s likely in Parks Township, but I have yet to find it. The nearest place I currently know to find it is at an intersection of 422/28/66Read More →

Wilkingia

Described by Hall in 1852, specimens have been found from the Brush Creek Limestone and Ames Limestone of Ohio. I have found a large number of specimens here in Parks Township, and this is one of the best ones to date. Both sizes of the specimen are details and itRead More →

Metacoceras

Limestone found in water usually yields better specimens. The water works its way into the cracks and crevices within the rock and specimens often come out easier compared to dry limestone. This specimen of Metacoceras is one of my best ones yet, coming out in once piece and showing aRead More →

Petalodus Tooth

In going back to the area where I typically find Petalodus teeth, I have several pieces of limestone separated out to look for. In searching, I found another tooth. However upon closer inspection I figured out that I had found the other side of tooth no. 6. Petalodus CatalogRead More →

This trilobite tail, also known as a pygidium was embedded in Brush Creek Limestone. By the Carboniferous, trilobites were on the decline, and evolution was making them smaller and smaller. Only the order Proetida survived into the Carboniferous, and later died out at the end of the Permian. It wouldRead More →

Paleoneilo

The genus Edmondia was first described by de Koninck in 1841. The book is Description des animaux fossiles qui se trouvent dans le terrain carbonifĂ©re de Belgique, written in the French language. The genus occurs from 252.3 to 457.5 million years ago. It died out during the Permian–Triassic extinction event.Read More →

While sorting through the endless piles of fossil pieces I have set near the lab microscope, I found another piece of a Petalodus Tooth. This is the most incomplete of the teeth I’ve found to date, with only a microscopic tooth chip left behind. However, this helps with microscopic viewsRead More →

Aviculopinna peracuta

I’m not certain on the genus and species. I’ve considered Meekopinna Americana and Aviculopinna peracuta as possibilities. However, upon reading an article from the Journal of Paleontology, the entire family is in need of some clarification. We understand, however, that the Paleozoic Pinnidae are in need of a complete reinvestigation;Read More →

The genus Odontopteris is one of many seed fern varieties that existed during the Carboniferous. I have a high confidence that I have the genus correct, however I am awaiting more research before I can confirm. The visible leaf of the glued specimen is 100mm in length.Read More →