This tiny late Paleozoic gastropod is most likely identified as Strobeus brevis. Measuring somewhere between four and five millimeters, this snail would be difficult to spot if you were not looking for it. This makes identifying it slightly more difficult, with small morphology to compare. Its spire does have aRead More →

In writing the most recent research article, Aviculopinna, I set up an area to photograph specimens. While having this setup available, I went ahead and re-photographed the first seven specimens in the fossil catalog. Specimen CG-0001 John Harper identified this specimen as possibly being Orthotetes, a brachiopod. The preservation isRead More →

Worthenia tabulata specimen CG-0110

The gastropod Worthenia tabulata is a more popular species than some that I have written about. A quick search online reveals more pages than average compared to others. This genus of gastropod existed for 216 million years in the fossil record, surviving the Permian-Triassic extinction that many local genera diedRead More →

The genus Bellerophon is chock full of different species. This particular specimen was found in the soft punky later over top of the limestone, right after I found a specimen of Pulchratia. I often find pieces of these, however nothing with detailed ornamentation like this example. Next I will haveRead More →

This gastropod has a highly probable Identification. I have confirmation that Trepospira sphaerulata is found in this and nearby limestone layers. Based on the nodes visible on the top of the last whorl, a local fossil gastropod expert gives this as a likely identification. This specimen comes from the PineRead More →

Shansiella carbonaria Specimen CG-0060

First described by Norwood and Pratten in 1855, Shansiella carbonaria is a very common fossil gastropod. The species existed from 306.95 to 295 million years ago. The genus Shansiella, first described by Yin in 1932, existed from 360.7 until 254 million years ago. Originally the species was named Pleurotomaria carbonaria.Read More →

Gastropods from Pine Creek Limestone

The Pine Creek Limestone is supposed to be somewhere in my local area, but perhaps it was not laid down as strata here. It’s likely in Parks Township, but I have yet to find it. The nearest place I currently know to find it is at an intersection of 422/28/66Read More →

Amphiscapha is a common fossil in Parks Township. It appears often as a flat spiral within shale. This particular specimen was accompanied by two Meekospira. I used a pair of engineering tweezers to remove some matrix from the sides of the larger of the two Meekospira. First described in 1942Read More →