This small specimen represents four leaves of the genus Neuropteris. These were arranged on a side branch, as each stem of the species had a number of side branches of different lengths to make what is a classic fern shape. These come from a shale layer about twenty feet belowRead More →

Pecopteris

Two examples of local fossil plant fauna, both specimens were found in Guffy Run. Calamites Calamites is common in the shale below the Brush Creek Limestone. Typically a wide, long and flat fossil, it’s difficult to find large specimens locally in-tact. This one was face up in the stream bedRead More →

Macroneuropteris is a much more rare genus than Pecopteris. However, these can be found locally in the shale below the primary limestone layer. The detail within the leaf of this specimen is stunning in my opinion. The Middle Pennsylvanian Sydney Mines Formation, found in Nova Scotia, Canada, have revealed aRead More →

Closely related to modern horsetails, Calamites is an extinct genus that existed from the Carboniferous until the early Permian. Horsetails are one of several genera considered to be living fossils. They reproduce using spores, which were similar to Lepidodendron. Both Lepidodendron and Calamites produced cone arrangements of spores. This genusRead More →

Lepidodendron fossil in sandstone.

My daughter found this Lepidodendron specimen during a quick expedition to explore exposed shale along a steep roadside hill. It was lying along side the road on a raised dirt pile on top of the soil. Logically, I believe this piece was unearthed while PennDot was making road repairs. ThisRead More →

Macroneuropteris

Macroneuropteris is a seed plant that has a temporal range only in the Carboniferous. I found this specimen in the talus near the lab. Most specimens I find are of small leaves, or large pieces of bark. This was more certainly a large leaf. I wanted to show the leafRead More →

Pecopteris

2019-04-LS-000 Identification as Pecopteris is very likely. This comes from a newly found shale landslide. The piece had fell out of the hill and was lying on the ground. The rock is very fragile. The colors shown are more rare in this area, more commonly being a grey shale withRead More →

Huge slabs of weathered shale and slate run down the local stream nearby. Lifting pieces up can introduce you to a large number of different fern fossils. There are bits of Lepidophylloides and pieces of Lepidodendron bark. The ferns could be Neuropteris or Pecopteris, and I am leaning towards PecopterisRead More →