Fossilized Paleozoic Ammonoids are a rare find in the Glenshaw Formation. When recovered, these specimens can be challenging to identify. I have recovered a few ammonoids, but as far as volume goes, the nautiloids rule the available fauna. I found my first ammonoid early, but I could not identify itRead More →

Asterophyllites have been a genus of fossil plants that I have been hunting for since I started collecting fossils locally. Today I was able to recover my first specimen of one. These are the branches that come out at the nodes of the genus Calamites. While these are two separateRead More →

Cordaites and Calamites are two familiar plants in the Late Pennsylvanian fossil fauna. The two are similar as fossils, presenting as long horizontal grooves in rocks. Cordaites differs from Calamites as the latter has a termination of the groves with occasional perpendicular grooves coming from the presence of nodes. IRead More →

Timothy Conrad’s description of the Paleozoic gastropod Turbo insectus in 1835 was an open and shut case. In his historic, single sentence description, he described and figured a new species of the genus Turbo. His was the first report of North American marine fossils of the Pennsylvanian age. Unfortunately, thisRead More →

Recently I was able to obtain two nice examples of Lepidodendron from the Pottsville Formation in Alabama. This formation is two formations away from the Glenshaw, having the Allegheny Formation between them. Both specimens are different species, however, species for these could very well just mean they come from aRead More →

Antiquatonia portlockiana

Norwood and Pratten first described Antiquatonia portlockiana in 1855 as Producti portlockianus. In 1976, the species was rearranged as Antiquatonia portlockiana by Douglas C. Brew and Stanley S. Beus. Specimens of Antiquatonia Portlockiana from Armstrong County Brachiopods have been a less-than-common find at the Pine Creek locality. Gastropods, Cephalopods, andRead More →

Endelocrinus murrysvillensis

Endelocrinus murrysvillensis is a species of crinoid that was first described in 1967 by John James Burke. Crinoids are a long-lived class of invertebrates that have existed from Ordovician times to the current day. Nicknamed sea lilies, these beautiful sea creatures are often found as small disc-shaped fossils with aRead More →